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Where will they work?

In the next ten years, millions with autism will reach adulthood and be available to enter the workforce. With 76 million worldwide on the autism spectrum, where will they work?

With global unemployment trending down since 2010 according to the World Bank, auticon is encouraging readers to consider those that are not reflected among these figures. For job autistic job hunters, the unemployment numbers are soaring. Globally, up to 90% of adults on the autism spectrum are either unemployed or under-employed in part-time jobs that don’t take full advantage of their skills; 77% who are unemployed say they are eager to work (National Autistic Society, 2016). Despite this, over the next ten years, millions with autism will reach adulthood and be available to enter the workforce. With 76 million worldwide on the autism spectrum, where will they work?

The data below illustrates the ongoing plight of adults on the autism spectrum who are entering our global workforce. Additionally, we have captured this data into a PDF infographic and encourage you to share it on social media with hashtag #AutismInTech.

Economic losses soar

In looking at the costs of autism to our economy, including therapy, medical, and support services, the largest cost, 58% is individual loss of productivity as it relates to unemployment. In the United States alone, social services and health support for adults with autism cost tax­payers nearly $200 billion a year. Despite this, many are capable of earning an income and living independently. (WISH Autism Report, 2016)

Businesses fear getting support wrong

Workers with autism often require special support and accommodations at work; 60% of employers fear they will get the needed support wrong. (National Autistic Society, October 2016)

Bullying and harassment are common

48% experienced bullying, discrimination or harassment at the office or place of employment; 51% attribute it to their autism. (National Autistic Society, 2016)

Strengths are very individual, but often include:

  • Attention to detail and systematical way of working
  • Sustainable concentration for routine activities
  • Logical analysis
  • Pattern recognition
  • Error detection

An asset to any company

Special talents in logic, detail and pattern recognition are typical for many people with autism as well as enormous concentration and a pronounced interest in IT, physics, mathematics and technology.

Support, understanding and acceptance needed

The most meaningful changes needed in the workplace to help autistic people are support, understanding or acceptance. (National Autistic Society, October 2016)

Solving the tech-talent gap

While 65% of CIO’s surveyed by KPMG show hiring challenges are hurting the IT industry. auticon’s talented autistic workforce is the ideal solution for the tech-talent gap.

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